Description of node <http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en>

Subject Predicate Object
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#type http://rdf-vocabulary.ddialliance.org/xkos#ExplanatoryNote
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en http://purl.org/pav/version 2
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en http://rdf-vocabulary.ddialliance.org/xkos#plainText The mean is the simplest indicator to summarise information provided by a set of statistical data: it is equal to the sum of these data divided by their number. It can therefore be calculated in the knowledge of only these two elements, and without knowledge of the full distribution.The mean of a distribution is not always the best indicator: the median is often more relevant. But calculating the median requires knowledge of the full distribution, or at least its central part.
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en http://purl.org/dc/terms/language en
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en http://eurovoc.europa.eu/schema#noteLiteral <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p>The mean is the simplest indicator to summarise information provided by a set of statistical data: it is equal to the sum of these data divided by their number. It can therefore be calculated in the knowledge of only these two elements, and without knowledge of the full distribution.</p><p>The mean of a distribution is not always the best indicator: the median is often more relevant. But calculating the median requires knowledge of the full distribution, or at least its central part.</p></div>
http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970 http://www.w3.org/2004/02/skos/core#definition http://id.insee.fr/concepts/definition/c1970/definition/v2/en